Create Habits that Stick. Step 4!

The 4th and final step from Mangoman Nutrition.

Step 4: Habit-Proof Your Environment

If your environment reeks of temptation, new habits are incredibly hard to create. Your environment has a nasty way of talking to your subconscious – so why not set up your home, car and office for success?

Example #1: Suppose your new intended habit is to eat less packaged products. Start by removing ALL packaged products from your kitchen. Don’t let the prospect of waste stop you from making the change you want. Donate uneaten items to a food bank. In this way, you make success effortless by simply removing the temptation to fail. Out of sight, out of mind.

Example #2: Suppose you are trying to adopt a morning workout regimen. Start by placing your shoes and workout clothes at the foot of your bed so that you’re forced to wear them before doing anything else. Setting up your environment for success prevents you from having to think.

Example #3: Suppose you are trying to prepare dinner 5 days a week at home. Before making this habit, make sure that you have the proper tools. Do you have a baking sheet? A cheese grater? A blender? A spatula? A non-stick frying pan? Be sure that you have the essentials, otherwise preparing dinner will be frustrating and easily forgettable.

Creating habits can actually be a fun and enjoyable way to change your existing routine, even though the first few repetitions may feel difficult. The next time you are trying to establish a new habit, follow these 4 steps and watch as you become a habit master. Changing your lifestyle can be an incredibly enjoyable process if you approach it with the right system in mind.

About Cyrus Khambatta, PhD

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Cyrus Khambatta is a nutrition and fitness coach that specializes in plant-based nutrition education. He was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at the age of 22, and decided to study towards a PhD in Nutritional Biochemistry to understand the molecular level details of nutrition and fitness for long-term disease prevention. He owns and operates Mangoman Nutrition and Fitness based in San Francisco, and has developed innovative 6-month small-group nutrition and fitness programs to educate, inspire, motivate and train clients to optimal health and exceptional fitness.

Interested in learning more? Check out his small-group nutrition and fitness program for women.


Create Habits that Stick. Step 3!

Step 3: Tell Someone Else Your Intended Habit and How You Will Achieve It. Be  Specific.

Accountability is an extremely important aspect of creating new habits. It’s one thing to tell yourself what you intend to do, it’s entirely different to tell someone else. I always tell my clients to verbalize their new habits to me and to at least one other person. Better yet, verbalize your habits to a small group of people for increased accountability.

When declaring a new habit, simply saying the words out loud makes your intention real. Telling someone else how you will achieve that habit reinforces your approach. Here are some specific examples that have worked with my previous clients:

“I want to bicycle to work 3 days per week. I will do this by starting at 7:30AM and I will wear gloves to prevent my hands from getting too cold.”

“I want to reduce my coffee consumption to 1 cup per day. I will do this by only going to the café in the afternoon, and I will not drink coffee after 3pm.”

“I want to increase my running mileage to 20 miles per week. I will do this by going running 4 days per week for a minimum of 5 miles per run. I will run in the morning before work to make sure that I don’t make excuses towards the end of the day.”

Come back for the conclusion of the is four part series: Step 4: Habit-Proof Your Environment

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About Cyrus Khambatta, PhD

Cyrus Khambatta is a nutrition and fitness coach that specializes in plant-based nutrition education. He was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at the age of 22, and decided to study towards a PhD in Nutritional Biochemistry to understand the molecular level details of nutrition and fitness for long-term disease prevention. He owns and operates Mangoman Nutrition and Fitness based in San Francisco, and has developed innovative 6-month small-group nutrition and fitness programs to educate, inspire, motivate and train clients to optimal health and exceptional fitness.

Interested in learning more? Check out his small-group nutrition and fitness program for women.


Create Habits that Stick. Step 2!

Step 2: Be Consistent in Your Approach

Consistency is the single most valuable tool in your lifestyle-change toolbox. They don’t call habits “behavioral patterns” for nothing. In the same way that a pattern is a series of repeated elements, a habit can easily be thought of as a series of repeated motions. Let’s imagine that you are trying to establish a morning workout pattern. Create a two-week calendar and visually mark down the days you intend to exercise in the AM hours. Commit to this pattern for two weeks even though it may disrupt your current routine. After two weeks you should feel distinctly more comfortable with morning workouts than you did on day 1.

The mere act of following through on your intended habit in the short term makes it more likely that you will succeed in the long term. The first two weeks are usually the most difficult, so follow through at all costs and watch as your new habit becomes effortless.

Be sure to come back tomorrow for: Step 3: Tell Someone Else Your Intended Habit and How You Will Achieve It.

About Cyrus Khambatta, PhD

cyrus-headshot_3.jpg

Cyrus Khambatta is a nutrition and fitness coach that specializes in plant-based nutrition education. He was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at the age of 22, and decided to study towards a PhD in Nutritional Biochemistry to understand the molecular level details of nutrition and fitness for long-term disease prevention. He owns and operates Mangoman Nutrition and Fitness based in San Francisco, and has developed innovative 6-month small-group nutrition and fitness programs to educate, inspire, motivate and train clients to optimal health and exceptional fitness.

Interested in learning more? Check out his small-group nutrition and fitness program for women.

Mangoman Nutrition and Fitness | Facebook | @drmangoman | Yelp

 

 

Four Fail Proof Methods to Create Habits that Stick

 

Habits are powerful creatures, aren't they?!  Who has a bad habit(s) they want to break?  How long have you wanted to or talked about breaking it?  How about a good habit you'd love to make a part of your daily or weekly routine?  Please share.  What is that habit?

I have a healthy habit I'm going after; in bed by 10 pm.  Yes!

Here to help us all get more sleep is Cyrus Khambatta of Mangoman Nutrition and Fitness.  I had the pleasure of meeting Cyrus through a dear CAN CAN Cleanse client and friend (thank you, Daniela!).  Cyrus brings his own life experiences, extensive studies in nutritional biochemistry, a solid understanding of the power of whole plant-based diet and a compassion for people to inspire and create habitual changes in the lives of his clients and those around him.

I'm delighted for him to share 4 powerful steps to changing your habits and creating new ones.

I'm sure ready to sleep more.  How about you?  Let's create good habits.  Get excited! You CAN do it!

Cyurs will be sharing one step per day on our blog so please check back for Steps 2, 3 & 4.

-Teresa

Here's Cyrus!

Developing impeccable nutrition and fitness habits is a topic on many people’s mind. We all want to be in better shape. We all want to eat healthier. We all want to be in complete control of our lifestyle, and block difficult emotions from dictating our desires to eat poorly and watch more TV. Everywhere you look, the message is out: Eat healthier, play more, get more sunlight, sleep better, stress less. But when it comes to executing these seemingly simple ideas, most people struggle. Why? Because changing your habits temporarily places you outside of your comfort zone, which can often result in the desire to adopt unhealthy “familiar” habits. 

Because of this large disconnect between what you know is good for you and what you actually do, developing habits is more of a mental exercise than it is physical. Stress, work and a busy social calendar are convenient excuses against the creation of new habits. But with the right system in place, these excuses disappear quickly. 

In this article I’ll share with you the 4 most important aspects of creating new habits. This system has worked for me and many of my clients, and continues to be a very powerful method of instituting positive change. Becoming a habit master is only a few steps away.

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Step 1: Don’t Bite off More Than You Can Chew

As a nutrition and fitness coach for busy individuals, I’ve come to recognize that the most important aspect of creating long-lasting habits is simple: don’t bite off more than you can chew. If you want to succeed at changing your lifestyle, change only one variable at a time.

Do you want to drink less coffee? Sleep more? Get to the gym 4 times per week? Pay more attention to people and less attention to your smartphone? These are all great ideas, but changing more than one at a time often leads to disaster.

On a piece of paper, list the habits you want to adopt over the next year of your life. It doesn’t matter how many there are – list them all. Next, rank them from high to low priority. Choose the highest priority habit on that list, and pretend like the others don’t exist. 

Be sure that creating this habit is realistic. This is the habit you will now create.

Be sure to come back next time for Step 2: Be Consistent in Your Approach!

 

Cyrus Khambatta, PhD, Nutritional Biochemistry

Mangoman Nutrition and Fitness, LLC

 Reversing Disease via Science-Based Whole Foods Nutrition. 

 And Incredibly Fun Fitness.

 Mangoman Nutrition and Fitness | Facebook | @drmangoman | Yelp

image:http://www.flickr.com/photos/waltstoneburner/5361595661/sizes/o/

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With Love!

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This just captures CAN CAN Cleanse perfectly! We make jars full of love for you! 

Yes, this was a Valentine's card and here we are a week after Valentine's Day, but never too late to share a little love, in jars. Ok-ok, enough already :)

PINK APPLESAUCE

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Recipe:

  • 6-7 apples, peeled & chopped into large pieces
  • 3 tbs ghee (clarified butter)
  • 3 cups water 
  • 1 small beet, peeled & chopped into small cubes
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon

Preparation:

In a large pot over medium heat, melt 2 tbs ghee. Add apples and stir. After 5 minutes, add water and bring to a boil. Add beets and sea salt. Cover with lid and reduce heat to low. Simmer until apples are soft. Approximately 10-12 minutes. If water is evaporating, add more 1/2 cup at a time.

Remove from heat. Remove pieces of beets and discard (or eat!). Add remaining 1 tbs of ghee and cinnamon. Stir well.  

Using a hand immersion blender or hi-speed blender, blend until smooth or desired consistency.

Cool and store in glass jars in refrigerator up to 5 days.

 

*I made this recipe and packaged it in mini CAN CAN jars to take to my son's Valentine's Day party. They were a total hit! Kids love applesauce! And moms: absolutely no refined sugar and only 100% natural, plant-based food coloring :)

Green Leaf Soup with Sweet Potato and Ginger

 

The 5th and final day of our soups in the colors of the Olympic rings!

Go USA!

Here's Green!

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1 large yellow onion

2 T coconut oil

sea salt

1 large sweet potato, peeled and diced

1 leek, chopped

1 bunch spinach, chopped

1 bunch green chard, chopped

3 T. fresh ginger, peeled and minced

2 c. low sodium vegetable broth

2-4 tsp lemon juice

black pepper

4 cups water

Heat pan over medium heat. Add coconut oil and saute onion until lightly caramelized. In a pot, add 4 cups water, sweet potato, leek, spinach, chard and ginger. Cover loosely and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes. Add cooked onion and vegetable broth. Simmer for 5 minutes. Add 2 tsp lemon juice and more to taste. Let soup cool and puree in blender or by using immersion blender. Delicious!

Makes 3-4 servings

Yellow Butternut Squash Soup

 

Day 4 of Our Olympic Ring Colored Soups

Here's Yellow!

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2 lb. butternut squash (1 whole)

1 T. olive oil

1 T. coconut oil

1/2 Granny Smith apple, peeled and diced

1/4 yellow onion, chopped

4 fresh sage leaves

3/4 cup low sodium vegetable broth

3/4 cup water

salt and pepper

dash cayenne pepper

Preheat oven to 425. Line a pan with foil. Cut squash in half and remove seeds. Rub cut side with olive oil and put cut side down on foil pan. Roast squash until very soft, about 45-60 minutes by testing with a fork. Heat soup pot over medium heat and add coconut oil. Sauté apple, sage leaves and onion until lightly caramelized. Add broth and water. Scoop out cooled, cooked squash with a spoon and add to pot. Simmer 15 minutes to combine. Add the dash of cayenne pepper. Use blender or immersion blender to puree until smooth. Serve warm!

Makes 3-4 servings

 

Our New SF Home!

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Have you driven by our cute awning yet? Wondering what's going on in that little hole-in-the-wall?! It's our new San Francisco pick-up outpost (formerly a flower shop). We're so happy to be in the 94115 neighborhood! Sundays - Thursdays 4pm - 6pm.

You'll now find even easier curbside service in the afternoons when you come to scoop up your cleanse. If you park and walk-in, we'd be delighted to share FREE samples of our seasonal juices, teas, & nut milks with you. And, starting next Tuesday ~ every Tuesday is officially "Tasting Tuesday" when we'll have lots of CAN CAN goodies for you to try :) Swing by!

At our new location, we're also offering clients, neighbors, friends, family and fans the opporutnity to pre-order a la carte beverages from our seasonal menu for pick-up. More info here on our website for you if you're interested in stocking your frig with more than a cleanse.

Our new outpost is also the cozy home of CAN CAN Nut Milk pick-ups, too. Drink more honest nut milks!

We're over the moon happy to be continuing to grow our offerings, services and build a better expereince for you, your bodies & minds. 

Thanks for all the love and support!

xx

Teresa

Roasted Red Beet Soup with Fennel and Orange

Day 3 of Our Olympic Ring Colored Soups

Here's RED!

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2 lb. beets, peeled and cubed

1 large fennel bulb, wedged

2 T. olive oil

2 T. coconut oil

1/2 tsp dried thyme (or 2 tsp fresh)

salt and pepper

1 large onion

2 garlic cloves

2 cups low sodium vegetable broth

2 cups water

1 cup fresh orange juice

1/2 tsp red wine vinegar

Preheat oven to 400. Toss beets and fennel pieces in olive oil, thyme, salt and pepper to taste. Spread out oiled cookie sheet and roast in oven for 45 minutes or until cooked through. Heat coconut oil in pan and sauté onion and garlic until lightly caramelized. Add roasted beets and fennel, vegetable broth, and water and bring to a boil for 15 minutes to blend the flavors. Let cool and then blend with immersion blender or blender. Stir in orange juice and red wine vinegar. Yum! Makes 3-4 servings

Black Bean Soup

Day 2 of Our Olympic Ring Colored Soups

Here's BLACK!

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Black Bean Soup

 

1/2 lb. dried black beans, soaked overnight in water and drained

1 medium onion, diced

1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 tsp ground cumin

1/2 tsp ground chipotle pepper

1 T. fresh minced cilantro

1 tsp. fresh lime juice

diced avocado for topping

Heat pan over medium heat and sauté onion, bell pepper, and garlic in 1/2 cup water. Add spices and stir to combine. Add soaked beans and 5 cups water. Simmer for about 1 hour or until beans are soft. Let cool and use blender or immersion blender to puree 2 cups of soup. Add back to the pot, and stir in cilantro and lime juice. Serve with avocado. Yum!

Makes 3-4 servings

Creamed Blue Potato Soup

On your mark!

Get set!

GO!

Starting today we are featuring a delicious winter soup recipe in each color of the five Olympic rings!  It's a marathon of warming goodness. Go USA!

Here's BLUE!

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2 T. coconut oil

1 medium onion, chopped

1 lb. blue potatoes, cubed

1 1/2 cups cauliflower florets

3 cups low sodium vegetable broth

3 cups water

1 bay leaf

1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg

1/2 tsp. pepper

salt to taste

Heat pot over medium heat and add coconut oil. Sauté onion until translucent and lightly caramelized. Add the rest of the ingredients, and bring to a boil. Lower heat and cover loosely with a lid and simmer until vegetables are cooked through and soft. Remove bay leaf. Let soup cool, and then puree in blender or by using an immersion blender until desired consistency. Enjoy!

Serves 3-4 people

Moringa!

 

You may have seen it on “The View” or “Dr. Oz.” Or, maybe you’ve caught an article or heard about this new “miracle” from a friend. What is it exactly? Moringa Oleifera is a plant, native to the foothills of the Himalayas and is used for its medicinal and nutritional properties.

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It’s grown in some countries because of its amazing ability to retain vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, but it has mostly gotten its media coverage for being proclaimed a very successful weight loss aid and energy booster.

Additional benefits may include:

  • Relief for anxiety and depression 
  • Evening out blood sugar
  • Improved immune function
  • Improved digestion
  • Lowering blood pressure 
  • Treating stomach ulcers 
  • Lessening joint pain
  • Lessening asthma symptoms 
  • Decreasing fluid retention
  • Fighting bacterial, fungal, viral and parasitic infections 

The leaf itself can be eaten like a salad or cooked, and stores very well. There are even smoothie recipes! In the U.S. it is most commonly sold in capsules or powders. As Moringa is an over the counter supplement, you can find it in health foods stores, vitamin shops and of course, the internet. 

Moringa is a dark green food, which can cause your blood to thicken. If you are taking blood-thinning medication or are pregnant you should consult your health care practitioner before taking Moringa, and start with a low dosage.

Some other side effects include:

  • Gag-reflex/vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Heartburn

According to WebMD, it is important to avoid eating the Moringa root or its extracts, as these contain a toxic substance that can cause serious harm such as paralysis or death. So, if you do decide to start taking Moringa supplements, be sure that it is the leaf. 

Another interesting thought is that Moringa potentially helps promote the production of glutathione within our bodies (1) we create. We need it for both liver and toxic metal detoxification. Glutathione can sometimes be inhibited by taking acetaminophen (better known as Tylenol), but a study shows that Moringa may help prevent this. (2)

Being in San Francisco I would love to try the Moringa leaf in a salad or even juiced! But it looks like the only way to get it here is as a capsule, dried tea, or powder. Unless you’re working with an experienced health professional, it’s best to stick to teas unless you have access to it fresh! 

Contributed by: Heather DiMambro, Certified Nutrition Consultant

 

Reference:

1. Bharali R, Tabassum J, Azad MR. Chemomodulatory effect of Moringa oleifera, Lam, on hepatic carcinogen metabolising enzymes, antioxidant parameters and skin papillomagenesis in mice. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. Apr-Jun 2003;4(2):131-139.

2. Fakurazi S, Hairuszah I, Nanthini U. Moringa oleifera Lam prevents acetaminophen induced liver injury through restoration of glutathione level. Food Chem Toxicol. Aug 2008;46(8):2611-2615.

Image: Plants of Hawaii, Image 070207-4337 from http://www.hear.org/starr/plants/images/image/?q=070207-4337

Snacking Vs. Square Meals- What’s best?

I used to have a one-track mind regarding this topic- always favoring snacking. But after more research and experience, I have come to realize that both are right! The key? Find out which works best for you and then learn how to do it right.

Snacking

Having a snack or two during the day (assuming it’s a healthy one) is ideal for many. Snacking keeps blood sugar levels even, allowing us to feel in control and energized throughout the day- especially crucial for those with low blood sugar (hypoglycemic) tendencies. Furthermore, having a healthy snack in the afternoon can prevent over eating in the evening. But this doesn’t mean we should snack our way through the day writing it off as healthy “grazing”. To give our digestive systems the proper rest and relaxation needed after eating, wait at least two hours between every meal and snack (three to four is better). A nice daily rhythm for this may be: breakfast around 8, lunch around 12, snack around 3, and dinner at 6 or 7.

Square Meals

On the flip side, three square meals can work great for others. Think of the French… they have never been snackers. Historically they have held each and every meal in reverence, striven to keep meals balanced, do not worry about eating too much fat, and admonish the notion of snacking- much less doing it at their desk or behind the wheel. Allowing more time in between meals truly gives the digestive system plenty of time to rest. As a bonus, it may even help increase fat-burning and anti-aging, something most all of us desire. You may in fact be doing a mini “cleanse” between meals. Again though, this is assuming the food intake for all three meals is healthy and balanced. A nice daily rhythm for this may be: breakfast around 8, lunch around 12 or 1, and dinner at 6 or 7.

I encourage experimenting when it comes to finding which “mode of operation” you do best with. And keep in mind one critical key for either one you chose--- relaxation. Take your time with meals and snacks to help your body get into the necessary mode for proper digestion and elimination all while supporting your adrenals (our stress handling organs). So switch off the TV or computer and put down your cell phone. Try eating with others on a regular basis and looking at your food more often- both help draw us into the present moment and send the right signals to our bodies and brain allowing food to be digested properly and stress-free. Finally, if you are concerned about weight management, I encourage a regular rule of no eating past 7pm. Eliminating snacking after this hour helps your body have a full 12+ hours of fasting to not only give those hard-working organs a break, but also give your body a chance to chip away at unwanted fat stores. This may be challenging for many, but giving yourself permission to have those evening foods you are craving as soon as you wake up the next day, can be a helpful tactic. So, find out your ideal eating rhythm and then practice slooooowing things down for better enjoyment and better health!

 

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Contributed by:
Sara Braxton Ferrigno, NC, RYT
Certified Nutritionist & 
Registered Yoga Instructor